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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
the unemployment rate is too high at the moment. so the head of the u.s. federal reserve has defended the central bank's monetary stimulus package. this has eased concerns fed officials would cut short their asset-buying program. chairman ben bernanke on tuesday presented his semi-annual report to the senate. he acknowledged bold monetary easing could cause inflationut stressedhe mit of the licy. >> we do not see potential cost to the increased risk taking in some financial markets as outweighing the benefits of promoting a strong economic recovery and more rapid job creation. >> bernanke also warned imminent spending cuts could put the brakes on recovery if they take effect on march 1st. he urged republicans and democrats to set aside their differences to find a solution. now, bernanke also said he understood japanese prime minister shinzo abe's push for heaid abe i trying to boost the economy and is not manipulating exchange rates to devalue the yen. >>> u.s. president barack obama wants republicans to compromise before budget cuts take effect on friday. >> there are too many republicans in con
a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 employees. >> our best goal going forward is to make it the biggest, strongest airline in the country, and i suppose that's about to happen. >> brown: the combined company will keep the american name and headquarters in fort worth, texas. but it is u.s. airways c.e.o. doug parker who will run it. his counterpart-- tom horton at american-- will serve as chairman, but bow out after the transition the two are friends who started their careers together at american three decades ago. >> to run a
for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan ot. entllysome kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? o we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you know, this is a very, very bad way to
broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about h positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world. >> i believe, and always have, that america must engage, not retreat, in the world, but engage in the world. my record is consistent on these points. >> woodruff: but as a nebraska senator, in 2007, hagel angered fellow republicans when he opposed the surge of u.s. troops into iraq
an and the future of the church, we're joined by monsignor rick hilgartner of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops. he's the executive director of the secretariat of divine worship. sister christine schenk, a catholic nun and executive director of future church, which calls for a more progressive church. and from rome, john allen of cnn. he covers the vatican for the network and for the "national catholic reporter." we thank you all three for being with us. john allen, i'm going to stay with you. how much of a surprise was this? >> judy, i think this was a near total shock. just to tell you how crazy it was, i was actually scheduled to have lunch with a senior vatican official, a guy who works just down the hall from the papal apartment. as of early this morning even he didn't know it was coming. as your set-up piece indicated the shock isn't the content of the decision -- benedict had hinted fairly openly that he was receptive to the idea of a pope resigning, that actually under some circumstances a pope would have an obligation t resign if he's not able to continue to rform his duties. b
life in prison. in economic news, output at u.s. auto plants fell in january, and that pushed overall manufacturing down after two months of gains. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained eight points to close at 13,981. the nasdaq fell six points to close at 3,192. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq dropped a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: president obama wrapped up his post-state of the union tour with a visit to his hometown today. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the president's trip to chicago came amid the country's new focus on gun violence. and while he was there to talk about raising the minimum wage and expanding preschool for children, the city's surge of gun killings wasn't far from his mind. >> last year, there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown everfour months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common-sense propo
in cyberspace. >> it is costing hundreds of billions of dollars and thousands of u.s. jobs every year. >> counterterrorism expert who worked under the reagan administration, both the bushes, president clinton. the pit cyber warfare they're waiting on the united states and have been doing it for years. who has been minding the store? >> there was a bill that had been agreed to on some cybersecurity and, you may recall, that the privacy aficionado's went bonkers it is it bananas' and bonkers together. they flooded their members of congress and and it did not pass anything. meanwhile, there is not a serious person in washington of any ideology who has not known with increasing power that this is a problem. the president said he will use his executive powers to do it and for all these people on the internet, this is just like a range and there can be no regulation whatsoever. it will come back to haunt us. >> we have this huge defense establishment and we have a place in maryland where they're supposed to know about this. >> it raises a strategic question we have now really thought throug
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)